Because I’m worth it

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So I’m still sad, but I’ve mostly numbed myself from reality or seeing/reading anything that could affect my emotions. Thinking about it hurts obviously, but I’ve learned to not resist and instead of finding distractions, I allow myself to view the pain from far. Then I’d observe the sadness as I would an art exhibition and let it go like releasing a balloon into the sky. It’s a conscious effort to will myself to not over-think and just let go, like what I have been saying in the past few blog posts.

I also realise I tend to blog on Sunday nights. Perhaps my mind becomes clearer after unwinding from the hectic workweek and my thoughts have been allowed to incubate.

Anyway, I read this article on The Guardian early last week when I was doing research for my work and thought “Wahey! I totally understand what this guy’s saying – economic terms and theories and all!”

It was a proud moment for me, because it proved that investing in myself to go for further studies had not been a complete waste of money and time. So yay. I deserve at least two pats.

Anyway, moving on to the article. It made me laugh. I was thoroughly amused by the author’s views and methods and, of course, the happy ending all good stories should have.

Here’s the premise: When one economist couldn’t get a girlfriend, he had an idea: restrict his supply, find a gap in the market and establish a monopoly.

Yes, the guy basically found love by using the principles of economics, which is bloody BRILLIANT. Don’t you think?

I realised that you can only play hard to get once the woman actually knows and likes you. This is because by then you have differentiated yourself from the other men on the market, so you gain more control over your market price. As you come to be seen as an individual with unique characteristics, rather than one of many men trying to get some attention in a club, the market structure changes from one of many competitors selling homogeneous goods to one of a handful of competitors. Playing hard to get is suited only to at least the second or third date, because only then is demand sufficiently inelastic for a woman to tolerate, or even be attracted by, a rise in price.

Being with Sarah cost me time, money and emotional investment. It also cost me the things that I couldn’t have because I was with her, such as nights out with my friends and the chance to meet other women. Those missed things are what are known, in economic terms, as opportunity costs. With these, we have to look at our spending decisions relative to what else is available to make sure we’re getting the best deal for ourselves.

If I’d thought more like an economist, I’d have known to disregard the time I had already spent queueing. That time had been and gone; it was a sunk cost. What I should have asked was, “What do I want to be doing right now?”

In short… Approach the problem (in this case, meeting the right person) rationally, target it with a few possible solutions, try, discard solution if it doesn’t work and try again until you achieve your goal. Simple… Right?

In conclusion, I’m gonna be a Rolex watch, baby!

P/S: If I ever fall in love again, I’m gonna love my other half using the Keynesian Multiplier approach.

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