0

The first step towards getting somewhere

20131205-073053.jpg

“The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide that you are not going to stay where you are.” —Unknown

Very true and wise, don’t you think? I’m been feeling so lazy recently it’s crazy how one can just lay in bed all day watching TV and playing on the iPhone. I’ve lost that bit of motivation somewhat in waking up early to have breakfast and get started on existing work or driving for more new business. I’ve been too … comfortable. And it scares me.

I recently attended a course on entrepreneurship, which discusses about the types of entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial traits and whether they are born with the qualities and if their circumstances that made them that way. It was a good module, because I finally learned how to spell “entrepreneur” correctly without struggling after the “p” part. Haha! But seriously, it taught me to look at myself — my behaviour in general, my attitude towards situations or people and my surroundings — and I have determined that I currently lack drive, because I’ve been too comfortable with life.

I still read a lot, but I’m not progressing any further with the new information and knowledge I’ve been absorbing like a sponge. I’m on a plateau and I need a push off it. I need to remind myself how thrilling it is to be filled with vigour in clinching new business, the pride in churning out quality work before the deadlines and (this is the most important bit) the joy in receiving that paycheque at the end of it.

Deep down, I know I’m born to do more with my time in this world. But the only way for me to do that is to stop sitting on (actually, it’s lying down most of the times) the plushy bed and get up (to work on the computer) to do stuff — useful things that will lift me up from the plateau to the peak of a menacing-looking mountain with a nice snowy cap. Perhaps I should take notes from a true entrepreneur, Richard Branson, who wanted more in life and dared to set up so many businesses and challenged the norm and was not afraid to fail and keep trying. In doing so, he became a knight for his bravery in the corporate world. Maybe if I ever falter and revert back to lazy mode, I should just keep asking myself: “WWRBD (What would Richard Branson do)?”

Sounds like a great doable plan. I have a totally smug expression now. If only you could see me now.

Right, so it’s five minutes more before my alarm rings for me to get ready for one full day of work. I’m gonna head out there to try seizing the day for myself. I hope this blog post has sort of inspired you to do the same. Carpe diem!

3

It’s okay if you haven’t achieved anything yet

20131104-232457.jpg

So I opened my Feedly app and this image and headline was the cover page of the day’s top news. With over 700 “shares” for this article, there must be plenty of people feeling the same way as I do. Coincidence? I think not.

According to a Facebook employee, you don’t have to achieve everything when you’re young. That’s a relief because I was getting worried about my lack of stellar achievements in my 30 years on earth.

It’s true what Anthony Sharwood said on news.com.au: If you don’t have the most happening career and the most Twitter followers and the greatest this and the most excellent that, you might start to look at all your successful friends and wonder ‘Why isn’t my life like that?’. And then you might begin to feel pretty down on yourself.

If you’re sighing sorrowfully now like me, the following might just change your entire perspective for the better. Kejia Zhu is a 29-year-old guy who was born in China. He grew up in the UK and now lives in America. Here’s what the Facebook employee has to say about the pursuit of success in his blog post:

“Do you sometimes lie awake worrying that you aren’t succeeding fast enough? Are you tortured by younger peers who have global businesses, penned acclaimed books and a string of iron-man medals? Do you count down the years until you can no longer make the 30 under 30 list? Take a deep breath. My 92 year old grandpa has some advice for you.

“He is a tremendously accomplished individual and considered by many to be a pioneer in biomedical engineering. I visited him in Beijing recently. We were taking an after dinner stroll. I was pestering him for details about his career, looking for tidbits that might help my own. What was he like at my age? How did he work? Is there a secret a routine? He stops me mid-sentence: ‘You know, my career only really took off after I turned 58.’

“Hang on, what?

‘Yes, I’d say the 10 years between my 60s and 70s were my busiest.’

“I was floored. Here is a man who helped revolutionise medical technology and he did it in his twilight years.”

Kejia’s grandfather had gone through various hardships in China, because of the political turmoil and World War II. He found success only in the late 1970s.

“My grandpa’s story made me reflect upon the worship of youthful achievement and our drive to get it all so early in life. I, like many other insecure overachievers, feel an urgency to do big things. Deep down I know this anxiety is root in fear. That I’m not actually any good. That I will waste my shot at life and be a disappointment. So I strive for a quick success because I need to validate my worth. After that I can relax and everything will be plain sailing. Right? Instead, this warped expectation more often leads me to behave in a manner that’s unsustainable and counterproductive.

“It’s easy to forget that our careers extend for decades beyond our 20s and 30s. The truth is significant works usually take a long time. Whether it’s business, academia or the arts, most of the contributions made have been the result of many years of toil. It’s just that we hear of the young overnight success because that’s a more attractive narrative. Even then, those rare few who achieve a lot early in life do not simply stop. The race doesn’t end with the win.

“My grandpa had no choice but to wait a long time for his opportunity. It’s likely he would have achieved even more had be moved to the West. However, had he missed his moment, I dare say he would still have had a fulfilling life. Without the acclaim and recognition he’d still be the jovial, curious and industrious man I love.

“His advice to me: ‘Don’t be in so much of a rush. Be easier on yourself. Comparing yourself to what others are doing is a waste of time.'”

Kejia’s grandfather dispenses one last morsel of wisdom—an old Chinese saying “大器晚成” that roughly translates to “A big construction is always completed late.”

Encouraging, huh? If you had been holding your breath and worrying yourself sick this whole time wondering if you will ever get to the metaphorical “top”, you may exhale now. Take a chill pill and be patient.

Something else Kejia said to news.com.au struck a chord in me:

“It feels like I was part of the generation groomed to feel like they could and should achieve everything. I, for one, have been anxious about living up to this expectation and could see many of my peers felt the same, though it was never talked about. …

“Despite some early successes, I feel rather unremarkable here, which is a good thing. I wanted to be in a position, where I could feel like a rookie and soak up the learning. I do think that the high achievement-driven attitude that fuels this area has a negative impact on people’s expectations of themselves.”

You know what the moral of this blog post is, don’t you? Don’t fret over whether you’re the smarter than everyone else or if you’re way ahead in the rat race. Just know what you want in life and do things in your own time and trust that the universe will do the rest.

0

Don’t give up on what you want most

20130124-234601.jpg

I think this rule applies to almost everything in life. Want more money? Work hard. Want to have a successful career? Work hard. Want to get good grades? Work hard.

‘Don’t give up what you want most for what you want now.’

It’s true, you know. If you just lay there and watch TV or play your favourite iPhone game the whole night, what sort of rewards do you think you will get in return? Money? Job offers? More knowledge? Haha!

So with this in mind, I shall get up from bed now and start on some way overdue work. Procrastination is a very scary habit to have… Everything just piles up and you end up having to clear a lot of work at once. 😦

It’s only the 25th day of the new year and I already feel jaded and unmotivated. How to get through the rest of 2013 at this rate?!

But still, life has been good to me. And according to the feng shui for the upcoming Year of the Snake, I’m gonna have a very good year ahead, especially for my career and wealth prospects. Hehe! Wish me luck!

0

Drink less, work more

20120908-134957.jpg

Gina Rinehart, world’s richest woman, wrote: ‘Do something to make more money yourself.’ (Photo: AFP/File, Tony Ashby)

I read this article few days ago and I thought it was one of the most useful inspirational pieces someone who’s striving to be a success in life can take as motivation.

Writing in an industry magazine column, the world’s richest woman, Australian mining tycoon Gina Rinehart, urged those envious of the wealthy to do something about it, and stop whining.

Rinehart is the matriarch of her family iron ore prospecting fortune of US$30.1 billion, which also makes her Australia’s wealthiest person.

“There is no monopoly on becoming a millionaire,” she wrote.

“If you’re jealous of those with more money, don’t just sit there and complain. Do something to make more money yourself — spend less time drinking or smoking and socialising, and more time working.

“Become one of those people who work hard, invest and build, and at the same time create employment and opportunities for others.”

Other people (they’re probably myopic) have slammed her supposedly controversial remarks, but I think her words made absolute sense. And the fact that she has multiplied her family fortune to where it is now only enhances the value of her advice. Priceless.

I truly believe that if someone has perfectly functional limbs and mental intelligence, then they should work hard for what they want, instead of begrudging the government or the society or the environment or the people around them for not serving everything on a platter to them. Agree?

Those, who have been protesting that Rinehart should share her wealth with the poor, should just shut up. How would you like it if you were told to donate half your salary to poor strangers you don’t know every month? Don’t argue that you have less money than her. It’s a matter of perspective.

Giive Rinehart the benefit… She probably does her fair share of charity work and just hasn’t publicise every single activity, unlike other publicity seeking organisations that have to advertise every dollar they donate.

Remember, there’s no monopoly in earning your first million dollars.

Rinehart, you’ve got a supporter in me!

P/S: If your kids insist on taking you to court over the trust fund and you’re thinking of disowning them, I’m available for adoption. Ahem.

Standard
0

What I really do

If you have a Facebook account and have been logging on regularly to virtual stalk read your friends’ updates and whereabouts, then you would have seen this latest “What People Think I Do / What I Really Do” meme around the past two weeks.

Some of which are frankly hilarious and true to the core even though the pictures used look super 80s corny. But this meme is meant to be a spoof of those laminated “motivational” posters that were so darn popular in the early 2000s. So there.

According to Know Your Meme [via The Gawker], the “What People Think I Do” meme was created by the artist Garnet Hertz on Feb 9. Well in the weeks since then, I have seen almost every possible job being covered by creative (and quite possibly the most bo liao) people in the world. While some might wonder and ridicule people who want to tell the world how utterly boring their jobs are, I think it’s great to know the actual pain that everyone goes through in their jobs and it’s not a fairytale every day.

So this is what I used to do:

20120221-001724.jpg

Well, it’s actually a combination of the top row from the journalist’s meme and the bottom row from news editor (which is totally ALL true):

20120221-003438.jpg

After nodding furiously at how true the photo descriptions are, I found another meme that would be what I’d be really doing from now on. I sent the same image to my friend who has been doing the exact same thing for the past six months and she said: “How true :)” I practically beamed in public. So here it is and now you know me better already.

20120221-004323.jpg

[Photos via Stuff Journalists Like, Andrew Beginning, Michael Rubin]

Standard
0

The one behind your success

20120128-120355.jpg

I don’t know if the story below is true but it made me laugh and I love the idea of having someone who will always be there by my side and be part of my success.

One night, US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle decided to do something out of the routine and go for a casual dinner at a cozy restaurant that wasn’t too luxurious.

When they were seated, the owner of the restaurant asked the President’s Secret Service if he could speak to the First Lady in private. They obliged and Michelle had a chat with the owner.

Following the conversation, President Obama asked Michelle why the owner was so keen on speaking to her. Michelle replied that the owner had been madly in love with her during their teenage years.

President Obama then said: “So if you had married him, you would now be the owner of this lovely restaurant.”

To which Michelle responded: “No, if I had married him, he would now be the President.”

Standard
0

New Year’s Eve

A meaningful quote from the movie New Year’s Eve:

Claire: “It’s suspended there to remind us before we pop the champagne and celebrate the New Year, to stop and reflect on the year that has gone by. To remember both our triumphs and our missteps – our promises made, and broken. The times we opened ourselves up to great adventures – or closed ourselves down, for fear of getting hurt.

“Because that’s what New Year’s is all about: getting another chance. A chance to forgive, to do better, to do more, to give more, to love more. And stop worrying about ‘what if’ and start embracing what would be. So when that ball drops at midnight – and it will drop – let’s remember to be nice to each other, kind to each other. And not just tonight but all year long.”

Happy New Year and it will be a great year for all of us.

Now let us all be “psychotic” (inside joke) and only do the stuff that makes us happy because we must be happy always. Oh, and to take things easy, not take unhappy things to heart and let the bad stuff slide over us like water off a duck’s back because there is always a better tomorrow. Also, life’s too short to harp over assholes.