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Obsessing over Jaime and Julie

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Photo credit: The Internet

These past few days weeks I’ve been obsessing over two really, really hot female celebrities who are best friends IRL. They flirt, squabble, tease, laugh and are so close that I (plus all the fangirls/sci-fi geeks/nerdsbians over the world) really think that they should get married and walk off into the sunset. That’s how insanely good they look together. /me swoons and fans self.

I’ve been following their Twitter feeds, their fans’ Tumblr, Vine and YouTube (sometimes Pinterest) links and I still can’t get enough of Jaime Murray and Julie Benz. That’s how addicted I am to both of them as of 1 September 2013. It should be illegal for anyone to be so incredibly beautiful, funny, genuine, intelligent, snarky and gay-friendly at the same time. /me cannot stop hyperventilating and drool.

Because of Jaime and Julie (yeah, we are on a first-name basis now), I’ve recently learned new words like “nerdsbians”, “fangirls”, “fangirling”, “trolling”, “shtako” and, not forgetting, “squeee”. Argh, so hot!

Is it socially acceptable to cancel on friends at the very last minute just to stay home to google and refresh the shit out of the inter-webs just so I can gaze/watch/sigh at new tweets/pictures/videos of Jaime and Julie? Because that’s what I did yesterday and I have no ounce of regret or remorse. I didn’t even care what was on TV; I just wanted more Jaime info. I didn’t even want to start writing my business proposal which was time-critical, because Jaime > work.

You know there’s a game where out of three people, you choose to either marry, fuck and kill them? I’d so marry and fuck Jaime and kill everyone who gets in my way. That’s how massive my crush is for her right now!

And then I read about how she loves her lesbians for being “so intelligent and snarky” and how she graciously accepted her coronation as the Queen of Unicorns (and dragons) and how she even helped a girl propose to her girlfriend in front of the audience at Dragon Con. Oh and that Brit accent and caustic wit. Can she be anymore perfect? /me continues to swoon.

NB: The only thing that could make this even more awesome than it already is would be that Jaime has a gorgeous gay partner in real life. Omg that would be my fantasies come true! Make it happen, somebody!

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Five life lessons from Dr Seuss

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I’m blogging this pic because the quotes are mostly taken from my favourite Dr Seuss book (ever since we read it for someone’s birthday) and there are five of them, which is my favourite number. Ha!

And reading the list of simple truths made me grin a silly happy grin, so I want to share my joy with you. Yes, you.

It’s amazing how Dr Seuss can write stories that appear to be made up of gibberish and yet they are so enlightening. Agree?

I am totally gonna live my life like how Dr Seuss thinks everyone should! Join me!

P/S: This is also one of the fastest blog posts I have ever written.

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Stieg Larsson, you genius

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A quote taken from the book The Girl With A Dragon Tattoo.

The prior line was “Never engage…” This paragraph had a profound impact on me when I first read it. It made so much sense, even more so when my mentor said almost the same thing to me few days ago over lunch. What an coincidental symmetry.

So I have been reading crime novels written by the late Swedish author and journalist Stieg Larsson recently and I’ve been completely blown away. Which led me to a conundrum about the original books which were published in Swedish. Either he’s such a brilliant writer that his talent shines through despite the languages that the books were published in or he quite simply had a brilliant English translator.

The prose is written in a clear direct style that shows a strong journalistic background – short, direct, active sentences. Yet it also manages to draw the reader in an absorbing and engaging manner without losing its focus. (Remember how I said previously that Larsson managed to weave many layers of puzzles together without sounding confusing?)

The author is also unafraid to throw in big words to educate the reader (it is most likely just me being educated here but hey, I’m proud to admit my vocabulary has expanded from reading his books) or insert social issues to raise the reader’s awareness or add in strong Swedish-centric elements that may alienate non-Swedes. I have never been to Sweden but I feel that I know a bit more about the country now.

What I’m trying to say is Larsson treats his readers as a bunch of intelligent, objective and knowledge-thirsty audience. Which quite frankly is the opposite of what newsrooms and magazine publishers all over the world have been secretly telling journalists for years. Yes, we have been told to always keep our copy simple and treat the readers like idiots. “Explain succinctly, use simple words, don’t overload your readers with too much technical jargon or boring stuff, get right to the issue” are some of the often heard mantras.

So yes, this is refreshing and a style I’d aspire to emulate if I were to write a book.

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Stieg Larsson, you genius

20120306-234826.jpg

A quote taken from the book The Girl With A Dragon Tattoo.

The prior line was “Never engage…” This paragraph had a profound impact on me when I first read it. It made so much sense, even more so when my mentor said almost the same thing to me few days ago over lunch. What an coincidental symmetry.

So I have been reading crime novels written by the late Swedish author and journalist Stieg Larsson recently and I’ve been completely blown away. Which led me to a conundrum about the original books which were published in Swedish. Either he’s such a brilliant writer that his talent shines through despite the languages that the books were published in or he quite simply had a brilliant English translator.

The prose is written in a clear direct style that shows a strong journalistic background – short, direct, active sentences. Yet it also manages to draw the reader in an absorbing and engaging manner without losing its focus. (Remember how I said previously that Larsson managed to weave many layers of puzzles together without sounding confusing?)

The author is also unafraid to throw in big words to educate the reader (it is most likely just me being educated here but hey, I’m proud to admit my vocabulary has expanded from reading his books) or insert social issues to raise the reader’s awareness or add in strong Swedish-centric elements that may alienate non-Swedes. I have never been to Sweden but I feel that I know a bit more about the country now.

What I’m trying to say is Larsson treats his readers as a bunch of intelligent, objective and knowledge-thirsty audience. Which quite frankly is the opposite of what newsrooms and magazine publishers all over the world have been secretly telling journalists for years. Yes, we have been told to always keep our copy simple and treat the readers like idiots. “Explain succinctly, use simple words, don’t overload your readers with too much technical jargon or boring stuff, get right to the issue” are some of the often heard mantras.

So yes, this is refreshing and a style I’d aspire to emulate if I were to write a book.

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Girl with the dragon tattoo

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I never thought this was possible given how short my attention span has been reduced to after the discovery of the glorious internets, but yes, I am currently obsessed with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. The book, not an actual living person if that was what you had gleaned from the blog post’s title.

I can barely take my eyes off the ebook and pause for food or any other form of sustenance. I have even forsaken my beloved TV just so I can continue page after page of absorbing scenes of the mystery thriller that is taking place before my eyes. I am nowhere close to finishing the book yet and I’m secretly thrilled that there would be two more books after this.

I heard good reviews of the movie last year but I didn’t get to watch it. And recently I have seen people carrying the novel around. Most definitely due to the Oscars buzz. And after a quick check through my best friend Google, it was on the New York Times’ bestselling list in 2011. And I can see why.

The book has, in so many ways, made me in awe of the responsibility and credibility of publishing a magazine. It even made me proud to consider myself as a journalist even though I have never undertaken any investigative work to expose any underhanded business deals. And in spite of the drama and crime that unfolds, it has a consistently strong moral and societal message for the readers. The book also reveals many trade secrets behind the industries it talks about. I won’t be surprised if many elements had been derived from the author’s personal life and work experiences and things that have fuelled his passion.

Maybe that’s why I am so inspired and intrigued at how he has woven many pieces together that seem unrelated at first and yet these numerous layers fit perfectly like a completed jigsaw puzzle. Fascinating.

Yet, I am not sure if I’d want to watch the movie after I finish the book. But if I ever were to write a book, this is definitely one key inspiration.

[Image via Counter Currents]

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Up to snuff

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Finally got my hands on the latest Terry Pratchett novel for the DiscWorld series. Ok it’s been out since October last year but I haven’t had time to read it until today. I’m only about 60 pages into the book and it’s been an absorbing read.

I’ve always loved almost any book by Pratchett and this is no exception. The last book I read was I shall wear midnight, the final book in the Tiffany Aching and Wee Free Men “trilogy”. That made me laugh till my stomach literally ached. So I have high hopes for Snuff.

Ok, and I can’t keep this to myself any further because I want to gloat. I met my idol Pratchett at a book signing many years ago and I asked him politely as how a young besotted fan would while he wrote my name and some well wishes on the books I have proffered to him that if he could possibly publish more books in a year because I really can’t wait to read the next one every time I finished the latest DiscWorld novel. And now you can inhale the sweet oxygen sharply before reading further.

Pratchett replied something along the lines that he would very well like to do that but writing is not easy at all. Considering that I do not know the guy personally, I thought he sounded affronted and I felt almost embarrassed to have asked such a silly question. With that, I ambled on, wondering why I couldn’t have not say anything at all if I couldn’t offer something witty or intelligent. So this memory still haunts me to this day and yet my love for Pratchett’s books remains undiminished.

Personal review of ebook readers for iPhone

By the way, I found a new ebook reader for the iPhone. Yes, I finally discarded Stanza after the latest software update screwed up the app and rendered it completely useless. Maybe it’s Amazon’s way of telling us to get a Kindle. Which I did try to search for the Kindle iPhone reader but nothing turned up.

Anyway, I couldn’t get used to iBook even though its user interface is clean, friendly and oh-so-pretty like all other Apple products. Even the free books downloaded from the store look so classy in their vintage book jackets. And I may be wrong about this but I couldn’t add external ebooks or PDFs onto the app. It only allows books that are from the store. That was a bit awkward because I was looking for a solid ebook reader for every form of online content I may have.

Enter Kobo. It’s everything I want in an ebook reader and more. Clean user interface, minimalistic easy-on-the-eye design and the ability to add as many ebooks or PDFs and even newspapers or magazine subscriptions as you desire. It’s like iBook, but better and dare I say it, yes prettier. Seriously, try it for yourself. Kobo is really up to snuff.

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Happy 35th, Wolverine!

Wolverine fans rejoice, now you get to see the man with steel claws featured in other various art forms by Marvel’s band of A-list comic artists throughout April.

In other words, Marvel’s artists will reinterpret Wolverine in styles reminiscent of Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol and other notables, says Larry Fire.

Big year for Wolverine then, judging on the adulation he’s been getting. Joe Quesada, Marvel Comics’ editor-in-chief said, “He’s not just popular with fans but also with artists, as evidenced by how many of today’s top comic artists jockey for a chance to draw him.”

And that got Marvel thinking on how to best exploit showcase their star X-Men character. Quesada said, “What if Wolverine had been around for hundreds, if not thousands, of years? What great classic artists would want a crack at drawing a Wolverine cover?”

My favourite cover so far? This Salvador Dali-inspired version.

I don't do drugs. I am drugs.

I don't do drugs. I am drugs.

Credits: Larry Fire’s blog